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Dr. George Robinson Hill

Dr George Robinson Hill

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Dr. George R Hill
Nov 14, 1841 – Sept 1, 1914

George R Hill was born Nov 14, 1841 at Fredrick Town (Madison County), MO to James Hill and Mary J. Robinson (both parents born in England).

They came to America in 1829 and settled in Madison County, MO.
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CARTHAGE EVENING PRESS
SEPTEMBER 1, 1914

DR. GEORGE HILL 73, DIES
WAS ONE OF THE OLDEST PHYSICIANS IN COUNTY

SERVED AS CORONER AND ONCE WAS DEMOCRATIC CANDIDATE FOR CONGRESS – CONFEDERATE VETERAN

Dr. George R. Hill, who resided at 316 sophia street, died at 10:45 o’clock this morning after an illness of six weeks from a nervous breakdown. He was almost 73 years old.
For a number of years Dr. Hill was one of the most active and best known physicians of this city and county. He had resided in Carthage for 40 years, with the exception of several years, during which time he resided in Vinita, Oklahoma.

Dr. Hill was born at Fredricktown, Missouri November 14, 1841. He was educated in his home county and studied medicine under Dr. J. C. Griffith of Fredericktown. He also attended lectures at the St. Louis medical college. He was in the Confederate Army from 1861 to 1864 as a soldier. At the battle of Potosi, Missouri he was wounded and taken prisoner and remained on parole until 1864, when he joined the army again as assistant surgeon, and remained until the surrender of Lee.

He practiced medicine in his native county until 1872, when he moved to St. Clair county, Missouri. In 1876 he came to Carthage, where he remained in the practice of his profession, and served two years as county physician.
In 1895 he moved to Vinita, Oklahoma where he practiced medicine until 1907, when he returned to this city.
He was a member of the Masons and the Methodist Episcopal church South, having joined the church in 1888.

He was married in 1871 to Miss Maude B. Sandridge, of Fredricktown, a native of Mississippi. The wife and the following children survive;
George S. Hill of Bartlesville, Oklahoma
Mrs. John H. Harlin of Topeka, Kansas
Misses Dewdrop Hill and Jewell Hill, both of Carthage and D. P. Hill of Topeka, Kansas

He was once candidate for congress on the Democratic ticket. He was one of the boosters in the erection of the court house in Carthage, and also was active in street improvements.
He was for a long period a member of the school board and was active in church and religious work. For about 15 years he had been an invalid.

Burial was at Park Cemetery, Carthage on Sept 3, 1914 under the direction of Knell Undertaking Company.

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Pvt Miles Turner Abernathy

Son of JOHN Y. ABERNATHY and MATILDA ALEXANDER ABERNATHY.
Grandson of DAVID ABERNATHY/REVELOTIONARY SOLDIER/VA and NC

Brother of MARCUS L. ABERNATHY/CSA/MO.CALVARY CO.A. 3rd Regt./Lost his left leg due to a wound received at the BATTLE OF PEA RIDGE/ARKANSAS
Buried in OAK HILL CEMETERY/BARRY Co. Mo.

Also Brother to JAMES EPHRIAM ABERNATHY/CSA/MO.Calvary Co. A 3rd.Regt./Moved to Texas after the war. Died in Wise County,Texas.

CSA SERVICE/August 1, 1862 MO.Calvary 4th Corps.CO.A 3rd REGT.

Miles moved to Missouri in 1851. Living first in Greene County and then on to Barry County,Mo. by 1880.

He was employed as a Deputy Clerk to his brother MARCUS.

Miles Abernathy never married. After the death of his brother JAMES EPHRIAM ABERNATHY, he took in his 2 Nephews DAVID Y. and JOHN R. ABERNATHY.

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Pvt John Thompson Redding Co. E 27th Arkansas Infantry

Son of Thompson & Susan {Carter} Redding

Civil War Veteran
Company E, 27th Arkansas Infantry, Private, Confederate

John enlisted in the Confederate Forces while living in Carrolton, Arkansas in 1862. He was taken prisoner late in the war and patrolled at Shreveport, LA in 1865. When he returned home to Arkansas, he discovered his wife and family had moved to Barry County, MO. He rejoined them there.

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Pvt Absolum Barnes Company B 11th Missouri Infantry

Military History: Absolum Barnes enlisted in the 11th Regiment, Missouri Infantry, Company: B.
Cols. DeWitt C. Hunter, Simon P. Burns,
LtCol. Thomas H. Murray, S. P. Burns, Maj. T. H. Murray, James Phillips
The regiment was originally organized as the 2nd (Hunter’s) Missouri Infantry Cols. DeWitt C. Hunter, Simon P. Burns,
LtCol. Thomas H. Murray, S. P. Burns, Maj. T. H. Murray, James Phillips.
The regiment was originally organized as the 2nd (Hunter’s) Mo. Infantry Rgt. in the summer of 1862 and served as cavalry until dismounted on Aug. 31, 1862. In September 1862 it was designated the 8th (Burns) Mo. Infantry Cols. DeWitt C. Hunter, Simon P. Burns,
LtCol. Thomas H. Murray, S. P. Burns, Maj. T. H. Murray, James Phillips
The regiment was assigned to Parson’s Brigade, Trans-Mississippi
Department. It fought at Cane Hill, Prairie Grove and
Helena where it lost 14 killed, 82 wounded and 67 missing. On July 6,1863 it had 467 effectives. During the winter of 1863-1864 it was re-designated 11th Mo. Infantry Rgt. to conform to the CSA War Department number. It was assigned to Parson’s, S. P. Burns’ brigade, Trans-Mississippi Department. It lost five killed and 44 wounded at Pleasant Hill and two killed and 15 wounded at Jenkins’ Ferry. It disbanded in early 1865.

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Pvt Thomas Ferguson Co G

 

Thomas Hall Ferguson was the son of Anthony Ferguson (1805-1872) and Nancy C. Hall (1809-1872) of New Bern, Craven Co., NC. He was the twin brother of John Justice Ferguson, also born 30 May 1840 (see memorial #124416291). In Duval County, FL, he enlisted in the Confederate Army July 13, 1861, serving as a private in Company G, 2nd Regiment under Capt. J. J. Daniel. He married Clifford S. Geiger 26 September 1867, the daughter of John Geiger and Margaret King Geiger. At his death in 1886 his age was only 45 yrs. 7 mos. & 14 days. His 4 daughters were Cornelia T. Ferguson (1868-1888), Gulaelema A. Ferguson LoBean (1871-1931), Gertrude E. Ferguson Thompson (1877-1952) and Eugenia M. Ferguson Hubbard (1879-1952).

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Major General Gustavus Woodson Smith Georgia State Militia

Civil War Confederate Major General. He graduated from West Point in 1842, was commissioned an officer in the Army Corps of Engineers and served in the Mexican American War. After the war, he resigned his commission and became a civil engineer in New York City. At the start of the Civil War, he volunteered his serves to the Confederate Army and was commissioned Major General in command of the Northern Virginia, in September, 1861. He fought in the Battle of Seven Pines, the Peninsula Campaign and headed the Department of Richmond until January, 1863. In June, 1864, he was appointed Major General of the Georgia State Militia and commanded its first division to the end of the war. After the war, he become an iron manufacturer and served as the Kentucky Insurance Commissioner.

 

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Major General Gustavus Woodson Smith Georgia State Militia

Civil War Confederate Major General. He graduated from West Point in 1842, was commissioned an officer in the Army Corps of Engineers and served in the Mexican American War. After the war, he resigned his commission and became a civil engineer in New York City. At the start of the Civil War, he volunteered his serves to the Confederate Army and was commissioned Major General in command of the Northern Virginia, in September, 1861. He fought in the Battle of Seven Pines, the Peninsula Campaign and headed the Department of Richmond until January, 1863. In June, 1864, he was appointed Major General of the Georgia State Militia and commanded its first division to the end of the war. After the war, he become an iron manufacturer and served as the Kentucky Insurance Commissioner.

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2nd Sgt. Company F, 10th Texas Regiment, Texas Infantry

Morgan Price
1831-1919
Morgan Price was born ca. 1831 in Mississippi, the son of Jonathan and Mary Price. In 1850 the Price family was living in Lawrence County, Mississippi with Morgan attending school along with six siblings – five sisters and one brother.

Nancy Jane Myers and Morgan Price were married in 1855 in Lawrence County, Mississippi. By the late 1850s they had moved to the town of Booneville in Brazos County, Texas with there daughter and two sons.
On October 13, 1861 Morgan Price enrolled in the Confederate States Army at Millican, Texas as a non-commissioned officer a 2nd Sargent, in Captain Semore C. Brasher’s Company, Nelson’s Regiment of the Texas Volunteers. This company later became Company F, 10th Texas Regiment, Texas Infantry. 2nd Sgt. Price mustered into service at Houston, Texas on the same date. By November, Nelson’s Regiment was stationed at Virginia Point at Galveston, Texas.

A “Statement of Ordnance” or Statement of Arms at Hand” was described in a letter written by 1st Lt. J.T. Hearne on November 20, 1861, which showed the lack of weapons needed for the men at Virginia Point. The number of men totaled 497 while only 273 soldiers had muskets. 44 men were issued other types of weapons, which left 180 men without any weapons at all. This left an uneasy feeling amongst the troops at Virginia Point.

In March of 1862, the 10th Texas Infantry was stationed at Camp Brazos, Texas, when Colonel Allison Nelson gave the order to march the regiment to a new assignment with the Trans Mississippi Department. This assignment would take them to Little Rock, Arkansas. The10th Texas would arrive at Little Rock without the desperately needed weapons. It was four days after their arrival at Little Rock when the weapons were finally received.

On June 11, 1862 more weapons were received for the troops, but this time they were severely short on ammunition. Due to this lack of ammunition, the 10th Texas was unable to aide a Confederate garrison at Ft. Charles, Arkansas. Major General Thomas Hindman submitted the following report:
“Several days before this battle, Col. (afterward Brig. Gen.) Allison Nelson, now deceased, a most excellent officer, arrived at Little Rock, from Texas with his well-armed and finely-disciplined regiment of infantry. He was ordered to Saint Charles, in ample time to have reached there before it’s fall, but being without ammunition, was detained at Devall’s Bluff until I had succeeded in begging, buying, and impressing enough for 40 rounds, making it into cartridges and sending it to him by rail.”

Compiled Service Records show that on November 9, 1862, 2nd Sgt. Morgan Price was promoted to 1st Sergeant. From January 9-11, 1863the war would take its toll on 1st Sgt. Price. Fort Hindeman, or Arkansas Post, was built to defend against the Union army taking over the Arkansas River. The Confederate army was put in charge of this post in the fall of 1862. With Confederate troops numbering in the thousands settled in at the fort, the Union army attacked in their gunboats and on land, with charge after charge. This bombardment forced the Confederate troops into the fort on the bank of the river, where they surrendered their remaining troops on January 11th.

On January 11, 1863, 1st Sgt. Price’s name appeared on a Roll of Prisoners of War at Camp Douglas in Chicago, Illinois. Camp Douglas was known for its high mortality rate, unhealthy living conditions, disease, rodent infestation, lack of food and water along with extreme brutality towards the prisoners.

!st Sgt. Price was held at Camp Douglas for three months then appears on a Company Muster Roll “in hospital at Dalton, Ga.”

The Compiled Service Records for Price state the following:
“Most of the members of this regiment (the 10th Texas) were captured at Arkansas Post, Ark., January 11, 1863, and exchanged in April, 1863 east of the Mississippi River where they were temporarily consolidated in May, 1863 with similar remnants of the 6th Regiment Texas Infantry and the 15th Regiment Texas Cavalry. This consolidation was broken up in March 1864, and each company of this organization was mustered separately and under its original designation during that entire period. About April, 1865, this remnant of the regiment became Company D and E of the regiment which was formed by the consolidation of Granbury’s Texas Brigade and was paroled at Greensboro, N.C. about May 1, 1865.”

In 1866 in Millican, Brazos County, Texas, Morgan held a liquor license for Waggoner’s Bar. In 1870 Morgan operated a dry goods and grocery store in Bryan, Texas, and two more children, two sons, had been born with one son passed away.

In 1877 the family homesteaded land near Abilene, Taylor County, Texas. By 1880 the Price family resided in Precinct No. 3 in Taylor County, Texas where Morgan was listed as a farmer. The family numbered seven with wife Nancy, daughter Mary Ann, sons Joseph, Richard and Fred, and youngest daughter, Stella.

Sometime between 1880 and 1884, Morgan’s wife died in Texas and Morgan moved to California. Fred Price, son of Morgan and Nancy, stated thathis mother died when he was a young man. Fred worked on various ranches in Texas then traveled with older brother Joe to San Jacinto, California with horses to sell. They sold most of the horses at a profit, but kept a few to begin a freighting business with the horses and wagons. Around 1889 Morgan joined son Joe in California to help with the new venture.

A marriage license was issued in Los Angeles County, California on September 12, 1893 to “Morgan Price, a native of Mississippi, age 61 years, to Joanna Walter, a native of Germany, age 60 years; both residents of Fairmont.”

In 1900 Morgan and Johanna were living close to his son Fred in Fairmont, a town located on the west side of Antelope Valley. Around 1908, Morgan took up a homestead at North Portal in West Antelope Valley. He later sold part of the property to the Los Angeles Water and Power Company for a reservoir the Fairmont Reservoir. In 1910 Morgan was living with Fred and his wife Lulu (Walters) and their daughter Ada. Johanna Price died January of 1912.

Morgan Price passed away on October 13, 1919 at Del Sur on the west side of the Antelope Valley. He was buried at Lancaster Cemetery on October 15 in an unmarked grave, where he rests next to his son Fred, constable of Fairmont Township for twenty-four years, who died in 1946.
The following obituary was printed in the Ledger- Gazette newspaper on October 19, 1919:
AGED MAN DIES AT DEL SUR

Mr. Morgan Price died Monday at 10 o’clock at the home of his son, Mr. Fred Price, with who he had lived for the passed eight years. A complication of diseases incident to old age, was the cause of his death. He had reached the ripe old age of 88, and had enjoyed splendid health all of his life up to within a few weeks before his death. He leaves a son, Mr. Fred Price, and a number of friends in the valley,to mourn his loss. Internment occurred Wednesday afternoon at 3 o’clock in Lancaster cemetery, Mr. W.S. Mumaw having charge of the burial.

Mr. Price was born and reared in Mississippi, removing to California about thirty years ago. His wife preceded him to the other shore several years ago.

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Marcus Lee Abernathy

In August, 1861, Mr. Abernathy enlisted in the Confederate army, joining Company A, Third Regiment of Missouri Cavalry. During the battle of Pea Ridge on March 7, 1862, he was severely wounded by the bursting of a shell. It was necessary on account of the wound to amputate his left leg near the hip.
After the war he clerked in a store at Ebenezer, Mo., until 1871, when he removed to Cassville. Soon after he became deputy clerk of Barry county and in 1874 was elected clerk. He has served his constituents so faithfully and well that he has been re-elected at each succeeding election, being the present encumbent. He is a man of the people, universally respected by all parties, and is an adherent to Democratic principles. He is a consistent member of the Cumberland Presbyterian church, and is a member of I.O.O.F., and A. F. & A. M. His wife died in 1879.